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William Shakespeare about divine

William Shakespeare

Slender: I'll ne'er be drunk whilst I live again, but in honest, civil, godly company, for this trick: if I be drunk, I'll be drunk with those that have the fear of God, and not with drunken knaves.

classic lines from The Merry Wives of Windsor, Act I, Scene 1 by (1602)Report problemRelated quotes
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William Shakespeare

Desdemona: Heaven truly doth know it.
Othello: Heaven truly knows that thou art false as hell.

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William Shakespeare

This is the third time; I hope good luck lies in odd numbers.... There is divinity in odd numbers, either in nativity, chance, or death.

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William Shakespeare

Sonnet 106: When in the chronicle of wasted time

When in the chronicle of wasted time
I see descriptions of the fairest wights,
And beauty making beautiful old rhyme
In praise of ladies dead, and lovely knights,
Then, in the blazon of sweet beauty's best,
Of hand, of foot, of lip, of eye, of brow,
I see their antique pen would have expressed
Even such a beauty as you master now.
So all their praises are but prophecies
Of this our time, all you prefiguring;
And, for they looked but with divining eyes,
They had not skill enough your worth to sing.
For we, which now behold these present days,
Have eyes to wonder, but lack tongues to praise.

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William Shakespeare

Helena: Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie, which we ascribe to heaven.

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William Shakespeare

King Claudius: My words fly up, my thoughts remain below.
Words without thoughts never to heaven go.

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William Shakespeare

Ignorance is the curse of God; knowledge is the wing wherewith we fly to heaven.

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William Shakespeare

Berowne: And when love speaks, the voice of all the gods makes heaven drowsy with the harmony.

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William Shakespeare

Polonius: By heaven, it is as proper to our age to cast beyond ourselves in our opinions as it is common for the younger sort to lack discretion.

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William Shakespeare

Hamlet: God's bodykins, man, much better. Use every man
after his desert, and who should 'scape whipping?

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William Shakespeare

Sonnet 33: Full many a glorious morning have I seen

Full many a glorious morning have I seen
Flatter the mountaintops with sovereign eye,
Kissing with golden face the meadows green,
Gilding pale streams with heavenly alchemy;
Anon permit the basest clouds to ride
With ugly rack on his celestial face,
And from the forlorn world his visage hide,
Stealing unseen to west with this disgrace.
Even so my sun one early morn did shine
With all-triumphant splendour on my brow.
But out, alack! He was but one hour mine;
The region cloud hath masked him from me now.
Yet him for this my love no whit disdaineth;
Suns of the world may stain when heaven's sun staineth.

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William Shakespeare

O God, O God, how weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable seem to me all the uses of this world!

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William Shakespeare

Sonnet 21: So is it not with me as with that muse

So is it not with me as with that muse,
Stirred by a painted beauty to his verse,
Who heaven it self for ornament doth use
And every fair with his fair doth rehearse,
Making a couplement of proud compare
With sun and moon, with earth and sea's rich gems,
With April's first-born flowers, and all things rare
That heaven's air in this huge rondure hems.
O, let me, true in love, but truly write,
And then, believe me, my love is as fair
As any mother's child, though not so bright
As those gold candles fixed in heaven's air.
Let them say more that like of hearsay well;
I will not praise that purpose not to sell.

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William Shakespeare

Sonnet 17: Who will believe my verse in time to come

Who will believe my verse in time to come
If it were filled with your most high deserts?
Though yet heaven knows it is but as a tomb
Which hides your life, and shows not half your parts:
If I could write the beauty of your eyes,
And in fresh numbers number all your graces,
The age to come would say, "This poet lies,
Such heavenly touches ne'er touched earthly faces."
So should my papers, yellowed with their age,
Be scorned like old men of less truth than tongue,
And your true rights be termed a poet's rage,
And stretchèd metre of an antique song.
But were some child of yours alive that time,
You should live twice, in it and in my rhyme.

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William Shakespeare

Sonnet 21

So is it not with me as with that Muse,
Stirred by a painted beauty to his verse,
Who heaven itself for ornament doth use
And every fair with his fair doth rehearse,
Making a couplement of proud compare
With sun and moon, with earth and sea's rich gems,
With April's first-born flowers, and all things rare,
That heaven's air in this huge rondure hems.
O! let me, true in love, but truly write,
And then believe me, my love is as fair
As any mother's child, though not so bright
As those gold candles fixed in heaven's air:
Let them say more that like of hearsay well;
I will not praise that purpose not to sell.

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William Shakespeare

O! for a muse of fire, that would ascend the brightest heaven of invention.

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William Shakespeare

Bernardo: Last night of all, when yond same star that's westward from the pole had made his course to illume that part of heaven where now it burns, Marcellus and myself, the bell then beating one,--

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William Shakespeare

O! Let me not be mad, not mad, sweet heaven; keep me in temper; I would not be mad!

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William Shakespeare

The peace of heaven is theirs that lift their swords, in such a just an charitable war.

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William Shakespeare

Leave her to heaven and to those thorns that in her bosom lodge, to prick and sting her.

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